Diving In to “The Jesus Code”

by ggeurs

This is a review of the book The Jesus Code by O.S. Hawkins

 

Jesus asked questions of his disciples, not because he did not have an answer but because he wanted to disturb them to thought. Beginning with this as the foundation for the following 52 chapters, O.S. Hawkins provides an overview of fundamental Biblical ideas and concepts, using questions asked by various people in the Bible as the basis for devotional meditations in his book The Jesus Code. A note up front, do not buy this book unless you can devote at least 52 days to read this book, one chapter per day. The ideal way to read this book is to read one chapter a week, doing an in-depth study of the passage which contains each chapter’s topical question each week.

What impresses me about The Jesus Code is how extensive the topics in this book are: fate of the unreached (Ch. 2 “Shall Not the Judge of All the Earth Do Right”), depression (Ch.11 “What Are You Doing Here?”), personal reflection (Ch. 43 “Do You Love Me More Than These”), and other contemporary issues, as well as standard subjects such as faith, doubt, salvation, the roll of works, grace, and money management.

What frustrates me about this book is that at the sake of leaving the chapters brief enough to be read in one sitting, Hawkins leaves some of the Bible passages at the surface level. Whole books have been written on the implications of the parable of the Good Samaritan, and Hawkins packages it up in a five-page chapter (39).

Overall, O.S. Hawkins provides a good read for anyone claiming to be a Believer should read. Whether he or she uses it as the catalyst for an in-depth study, the reader would benefit from reading this book just to see if and how he or she would respond to the topics brought up in the 52 chapters of this book.

*Disclaimer: I received my copy of this book through the BookLook Bloggers Program for free in exchange for reviewing it. I was not obligated to post a positive review; the thoughts and opinions contained are my own.

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